Archview Physiotherapy Blogs

Reoccurring Ankle Sprains & Ligament Injuries

The most common acute sporting injuries seen are acute ankle sprains or ligament injuries in the ankle. The ankle has many ligaments to support the foot in different directions. These ligaments are usually damaged by quick turns, explosive twists or ‘going over’ on your foot.

There are 3 possible grades of tear to any ligament simply numbered 1,2 and 3, with grade 1 being minor damage and grade 3 being a complete tear.

If you suspect ligament damage in your ankle or an ankle sprain you should book a consultation with Archview Physiotherapy Clinic. Here one of our physiotherapists, physical therapists or sports therapists can assess and determine which ligament is injured, what grade of tear you may have and can then proceed to treat the injury.

Initially for any ankle sprain or ligament injury rest, ice, compression and elevation, also known as RICE, is recommended to reduce swelling and it enhances a quicker recovery in the initial 24 -48 hours. From there your therapist will work with you to restore a full range of motion, strengthen and condition the surrounding muscles and ligaments, work on proprioception and balance and eventually use functional exercises to aid in your return to daily life or sport.

If the correct rehabilitation is not followed it is very likely for a person to endure multiple or reoccurring ankle sprains. Many people claim it is due to having ‘weak’ ankles. However, with professional rehabilitation this problem will be minimised.

Call (01)4913228 or email info@archviewclinic.ie to book a consultation with one of our team to start your recovery.

Dublin City Marathon: Pre / Post- Marathon Massage Sessions!

The marathon training is in full swing for the Dublin City Marathon and  many participants don’t allow their bodies to recover enough in between sessions or long-distance runs.

In order to for your body to recover it is obviously important to keep hydration levels up and keep track of nutrition, ensuring you are eating enough protein for cell repair and growth and enough carbohydrates to give you the energy you need. Rest days are really important to allow the body to recover and a massage on a rest day can aid recovery even further.  Many athletes opt for a massage on a rest day or even go for pre or post-training/event massages to ensure they can give their best possible performance and to have a speedy recovery afterwards.

A pre-event massage will focus on increasing blood flow, flexibility and essentially warm up and keep the muscles loose, it will also decrease stiffness post event.

A post-event massage has many physiological benefits also, for example, it will aid recovery by flushing out lactic acid and reducing post-marathon soreness. It also has psychological benefits as many athletes will report that going for a massage post-event will lift their mood as well as help their body feel better.

If you are one of the 22,500 people taking part in the Dublin City Marathon this week, book in with one of our massage therapists at Archview Physiotherapy Clinic for a pre or post marathon massage! Call us on 014913228 or email info@archviewclinic.ie to book in now as we will fill up FAST!

Best of luck to all participants!

McKenzie Lumbar Rolls

The Original McKenzie® Lumbar Roll™ is the top-selling lumbar cushion and the ideal companion in the car, at the office or for use with any seat that does not provide adequate lumbar support. The built-in strap secures the lumbar roll to most chair backs and can even be used around the waist. It is the only lumbar support approved for use with the McKenzie Method®.

The McKenzie lumbar roll fits snuggly against your lower back, cushioning it and helping you maintain good posture and proper curvature of your spine.
The McKenzie Method is an approach that therapists at Archview Physiotherapy take when treating back pain which includes four main steps: Assessment, Classification, Treatment and Prevention. Lumbar rolls can aid in the treatment of back pain and prevent a problem from reoccurring.

McKenzie Lumbar Rolls can be purchased at Archview Physiotherapy Clinic. You can also follow our Ergonomic Tips in our previous blog to help improve your seating posture at work.

If you have any queries, please don’t hesitate to book a consultation with one of our physiotherapists by calling 014913228 or emailing our reception at info@archviewclinic.ie

Ergonomic Tips:

There is a whole science called ergonomics that is concerned with how people design and arrange things and interact with them efficiently and safely. Like your work desk for example. Use these 4 quick and easy ergonomic tips to improve your posture, allow the spine to stay upright, take pressure off the spinal joint and discs and muscles around the back, neck, shoulders and pelvis.

Tip 1:

Have all your computer devices or screens centred, the top of the screen should be at eye level. If you have more than one, ensure there is an even space between them.

Tip 2:

Ensure you’re sitting back fully into the chair with your feet placed flat on the floor. Your knee joint should be in line with or slightly lower than your hip. If they are higher this will cause your lower back to slump and put more pressure through the discs of your spine.

Tip 3:

A lumbar roll can help with improving your sitting posture. They should be placed in the curve of your lower back. We would recommend using a McKenzie Lumbar Roll, which we sell at our clinic. Be aware when you first start using one that it will take some time for your spine to adjust.

Tip 4:

Your elbows should be fully supported on the table in front as you type or on the armrest of your chair provided it is in line with the desk. You may need to push your computer and keyboard away from you so that the keyboard is at forearm distance. This will allow your neck muscles to be relaxed and will also take pressure off the discs in your spine.

Book a consultation:

At Archview Physiotherapy Clinic we can assess and treat bad posture. With physiotherapy treatment in conjunction with these tips you’ll be able to sit pain free at your desk in no time. If you have any enquiries please contact our reception desk on 014913228 or email us at info@archviewclinic.ie.

Physio-Pilates VS. Yoga

What is Pilates?

Pilates is a form of exercise developed by Joseph Pilates in the 1920’s. Pilates emphasizes correct postural alignment, core strength and muscle balance and flexibility. Its main aim is to tone your core and improve your posture.

At Archview Physiotherapy with offer Physio-Pilates instructed by chartered physiotherapists. These classes cater for everyone’s needs regardless of age or any previous/current injuries. Classes are instructed by physiotherapists and we keep the classes to a max of 7 people so that each client received adequate attention during the class. In an environment where the class is smaller the instructor can focus on helping you do these movements correctly, so you gain maximal benefits from the exercise.

What is the difference between yoga and Pilates?

Yoga is a type of exercise to improve flexibility and mainly promote relaxation. Pilates on the other hand is about control and is considered the best form of exercise to improve back pain and posture.

Why is Physio pilates beneficial for you?

When being instructed by a professional with a wide understanding of biomechanics, anatomy, safe principals of rehabilitation and a wide knowledge of spinal pathologies, you can be sure the class is going to be great. You will have an amazing experience knowing you are in good hands.

Archview Physiotherapy Clinic- Pilates classes

We don’t just offer pilates classes in groups. We also have 1-1 Pilates where you will get a completely personalised session to help improve areas that you specifically need to work on. This is great when returning from an injury or surgery to build back up strength and stability.

At Archview Physiotherapy, we also offer personal training and postural correction classes. For further information, please contact our reception desk on 014913228 or email us at info@archviewclinic.ie.

Dry Needling Treatment

Dry needling is a technique used at Archview Physiotherapy Clinic as part of treating painful muscle knots, known as myofascial trigger point knots. These needles are 8 times smaller than used for vaccinations, so they generally don’t cause pain worse than the symptoms you are already having. The aim of dry needling is to relieve muscle tightness and pain as well as improving the flexibility of the muscle. It is particularly effective in treating muscles which don’t release well through foam rolling and stretching and with muscles which fatigue fast during exercises training.

Do you ever feel like your legs are tight and heavy when you start back training?
Do you ever feel stiffness or achiness in your neck, shoulders or back after sitting for long hours?
Do you ever get tension headaches?
Do you ever feel like you stretch loads, but not sure your flexibility is not improving?
Do you ever wonder why you can’t achieve some movements or stretches in your yoga class?
Do you ever get cramps in your calves at night?
Do you have pain from teeth grinding or clenching your jaw muscles?

Dry needling has been clinically proven to be an extremely useful tool in all of these cases as well as many others.  A typical treatment lasts 30 minutes and although you may feel some tenderness after the session, you will notice an improvement almost immediately or within 24-48 hours.
Anyone experiencing pain can feel a benefit from dry needling. If you’re an athlete trying to return to sport, or you were in an accident, maybe even if you just have general muscle stiffness and achiness caused by long hours at the desk, dry needling will have a benefit. To book an appointment please contact our reception desk on 014913228 or email us at info@archviewclinic.ie.






Written by Shannon Byrne

Ergonomic Tips

Written by: Shannon Byrne

There is a whole science that is concerned with how people design and arrange things and interact with them efficiently and safely, this science is called ergonomics. Like your work desk for example, use these 4 quick easy tips to improve your posture, allow the spine to stay upright and take pressure off the spinal joint and discs, muscles around the back, neck, shoulders and pelvis.

Tip 1: Have all your computer devices or screens centred, the top of the screen should be at eye level. If you have more than one, ensure there is an even space between them.

Tip 2: Ensure you’re sitting back fully into the chair with your feet placed flat on the floor. Your knee joint should be in line with or slightly lower than your hip. If they are higher this will cause your lower back to slump and put more pressure through the discs of your spine.

Tip 3: A lumbar roll can help with improving your sitting posture. They should be placed in the curve of your lower back. We would recommend using a McKenzie Super role, which we sell at our clinic. Be aware when you first start using one that it will take some time for your spine to adjust.

Tip 4: Your elbows should be fully supported on the table in front as you type or on the armrest of your chair provided it is in line with the desk. You may need to push your computer and keyboard away from you so that the keyboard is at forearm distance. This will allow your neck muscles to be relaxed and will also take pressure off the discs in your spine.

At Archview Physiotherapy Clinic we can assess and treat bad posture and in conjunction with these tips you’ll be able to sit pain free at your desk. We can provide you with effective ergonomic tips which you can apply to your workspace. If you have any enquiries please contact our reception desk on (01)4913228 or email us at info@archviewclinic.ie.

Frozen Shoulder Treatment

Written by Siofra Fogarty

About your shoulder

The shoulder is a ball and socket joint. The shoulder capsule is tissue that surrounds the shoulder joint, supported by ligaments and muscles. The capsule supplies the joint with nutrients and lubricating fluid. It also helps to stabilise the shoulder.

What is frozen shoulder

Frozen shoulder is the painful and gradual stiffening of the shoulder capsule. This painful stiffening over time leads to sleep disturbance and limits your ability to use your arm in day- to-day activities.

How common is it?

It is most common in women than men and people aged 40-70 years.

Causes

The exact cause of frozen shoulder is unknown. For some reason your body has an over reactive response to a minor injury and tries to heal your shoulder capsule with scar tissue. This leads to pain and stiffness. People with diabetes or history of recent shoulder surgery or recent injury have an increased chance of developing this condition.

There is 3 distinct Phases of true frozen shoulder

  • Painful phase
  • Stiffness Phase
  • Thawing Phase

What happens during each Phase?

Painful phase

This can last from 2-9 months. The pain often starts gradually and builds up. It may be felt on the outside of the upper arm and can extend down to the elbow and even into the forearm.

It can be present at rest and is worse on movements of the arm. Sleeping is often affected, as lying on it is painful or impossible. During this time movements of the shoulder begin to be reduced.

Stiffness Phase

It can last from 4-12 months. Scar tissue forms around the shoulder joint making movement difficult. At this stage, pain can be more manageable and you are able to sleep better at night.

Thawing Phase

It can last from 5-26 months. The pain and stiffness starts to resolve during this phase, and movements become easier. This happens because your body starts to break down the scar tissue around your shoulder capsule.

Different treatment options

Physiotherapy treatment ca help to improve and maintain shoulder range of motion.

Along with prescribing an individualised exercise program consisting of stretches, strengthening and flexibility.

Heat pack x 15-20 minutes to help relieve pain and stiffness.

Avoid overhead movements.

Maintain correct posture.

Frozen shoulder anatomy

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS)

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS)

By Amanda Olsen, MISCP, ATC

Knee pain is a common reason for people to seek out physiotherapy. Our knees are an important joint in the body which helps keep us upright and moving so it’s understandable that when painful, it can be debilitating, and worrying. If you have knee pain your first thought may be that it is something sinister – i.e. torn meniscus (cartilage) or a ligament injury. However, often, it is simply Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS).

To understand Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS) it is important to know what the knee joint consists of – two joints: the tibial-femoral joint and the patellofemoral joint. The tibial-femoral joint is where the femur (thigh bone) and the tibia (shin bone) articulate and work together. The other joint, the patellofemoral joint, is where the patella (kneecap) articulates with the femur via a space called the trochlear groove at the distal end of the femur. While it is a small piece of bone, the patella is vital to a properly functioning knee. It acts as an attachment site for the quadriceps so it can work efficiently during movement. The quadriceps is a group of muscles that distally converge into the quadriceps tendon which attaches on the top of the patella. At the bottom of the patella, there is the patellar tendon, which attaches the patella to the tibia. It is also important to note that on the surface behind the patella, there is a layer of cartilage which enables smooth movement.

In a healthy knee, the patella should track upwards smoothly and shift a little laterally (in the outwards direction) along the trochlear groove during flexion and extension of the knee. In someone who has Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS), there may be a patellar mal-tracking present – most commonly an excessive gliding laterally when the knee is fully straight.

When this happens, you may experience some of, but not limited to, the following signs and symptoms:

  • A general diffuse-type pain all around the knee/kneecap
  • Pain or stiffness when sitting for long periods of time
  • Pain during exercise or activity à this can be as simple as when walking, but most noticeably with explosive or high impact movements such as squatting or jumping
  • Pain with stairs à ascending will hurt, but descending may be particularly worse
  • Crepitus may be heard à this is that awful crackling or popping sound your knee makes when bending and straightening it and is due to the cartilage behind the kneecap becoming rough from the mal-tracking

The key thing to note is that Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS) is not an acute, trauma-related problem. Rather, it is a gradual onset of muscle imbalances that if not picked up on, leads to pain and dysfunction.

Some common causes include, but again are not limited to:

  • Really tight hamstrings (back of the thigh): the hamstrings are responsible for bending the knee. If they are tight, there is a constant flexion force that the patella is counteracting even when the knee is straight.
  • Imbalance of VMO:VL firing ratio: the VMO (vastus medialis oblique) is a collection of muscle fibers of your quads on the inner part of your thigh and attaches onto the inner part of the patella. The VL (vastus lateralis) is the outer part of your quads and attaches onto the outer part of the patella. Ideally, the firing ratio when squeezing your quad, is equal, if not the VMO firing just before the VL does. If there is excessive firing of one over the other, that signifies an imbalance, and thus influences the patella to move more to that direction. Most commonly, it is the VL that takes over excessively, and the VMO is too weak to counteract the strength of those fibers.
  • Tight iliotibial band (IT Band): this is that thick band that runs down the outer part of your thigh, starting from the hip and inserting into the outer edge of the knee. This is most commonly tight in runners and cyclists. Some of the distal fibers of the IT Band converge with the distal fibers of the VL and thus can also influence patellar tracking and cause that excessive lateral shift.
  • Tight and weak quads overall: yes… they can be both at the same time! Tightness stems from trigger points (or knots) in the muscle fibers which doesn’t allow the muscle to stretch properly and thus cannot appropriately fire, which inhibits its ability to work and strengthen efficiently.
  • Weak gluteus muscles (buttocks muscles): if these are weak, then the thigh is prone to internally rotating more than it should during movement, and this causes an increased pressure on the knee
  • Fallen arches or overpronation: sometimes you are born with this. Fallen arches causes an increased pressure on the inner aspect of the knee and inhibiting proper patellar tracking.

As you can see, there are numerous causes that can contribute to Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS) and knee pain in general, and the list above isn’t exhaustive. Your physiotherapist will check these aspects in your initial assessment and treat accordingly through the use of hands-on myofascial release of tight muscles, dry needling, joint mobilizations to the patella and stretching and strengthening of what muscles are found to be tight and weak. You may be advised initially to modify your activity levels or stop altogether until symptoms settle. Once the imbalance is taken care of, and your pain has drastically reduced or ceased completely, return to the desired sport/activity levels will be commenced safely as per your physiotherapist’s guidance.

Anatomy of Patellofemoral Joint
Muscles of the upper leg

Physiotherapy Home Visit

Physiotherapy Home Visits – If you are unable to come to us we can come to you

Here at Archview Physiotherapy we provide Chartered Physiotherapy both in one of our clinics and in your home as part of our home visit service. We are available to call out to you or your family member if you are unable to get to the clinic.

There are many reasons why someone may not be able to come and see us in the clinic. Here is a short list of some of those: hip/knee replacements, recent surgery or fractures, severe back/neck/leg pain, decreased mobility, stroke, cerebral palsy, degenerative neurological conditions such as multiple sclerosis and motor neuron disease.

Prior to the home visit the physiotherapist would arrange a time that suits you and any family members that you may wish to be present. The physiotherapist would bring all the equipment they feel they might need. The treatment would last approximately 45minutes.

On the day the physiotherapist would arrive at your home and you would show them to the most appropriate area for them to discuss your issue, assess and treat your pain and see what yours needs are, then together we would set targets to achieve your goals. The physiotherapist will also examine you around your home to establish any possible issues i.e. trip hazards and they can advise you on how to adapt your home to ensure your safety.

After the consultation and treatment the physiotherapist will tailor an exercise programme for you which you would be required to do between physiotherapy treatments. This will enable you to get the best results from your treatment.

If you feel a home visit is a service you or one of your family members is in need of please do not hesitate to give us a call on 01-4913228 or email us on info@archviewclinic.ie for more information and to book an appointment for one of our Chartered Physiotherapists to come to your home.

Home visit physiotherapy